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How to Create Laravel Project

Last Updated on September 18, 2022 by Climent Rick

Laravel is a free and open-source PHP framework that implements the MVC pattern. It was created by Taylor Otwell and released in June 2011. Laravel aims to make the development process smoother and easier by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as authentication, routing, sessions, and caching.

In this tutorial, we will show you how to create a new Laravel project using Composer. We will also cover how to install Laravel dependencies, configure your environment variables, generate encryption keys, and run your first Laravel application.

  • 1-Install Composer 2-Create a new Laravel project using composer create-project command 3-Configure your application in the
  • env file 4-Set up your database 5-Run migrations to create tables in your database 6-Seed your database with dummy data (optional)

Composer Create-Project Laravel

Laravel is a popular, open-source PHP web framework with an expressive, elegant syntax. It is designed for the development of web applications following the MVC pattern and provides a powerful toolkit for both beginners and experienced developers. The Laravel framework has a large community of passionate developers who have contributed a great deal to its success.

In particular, the Composer create-project command can be used to quickly set up a new Laravel project without having to install or configure any dependencies yourself. Once you have installed Composer, creating a new Laravel project is as simple as running the following command from your terminal:

Composer Create-Project Laravel 8

Laravel 8 has been released! This new version of Laravel is a “long-term support” release and provides significant improvements over previous versions. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at some of the highlights of Laravel 8 and how you can get started with it today.

One of the major changes in Laravel 8 is the introduction of Jetstream. Jetstream is a Laravel-based UI package that provides a simple, yet powerful scaffolding for your application’s login, registration, email verification, two-factor authentication, and session management. Jetstream uses Tailwind CSS out of the box and offers livewire or inertia templates.

Another great new feature in Laravel 8 is model factories have been rewritten to be easier to use and more expressive. Model factories now support relationships, states, and attribute casting. Laravel 8 also introduces the concept of route wildcards.

Route wildcards allow you to capture segments of a URI within your routes without defining individual routes for each segment. For example, you might want to capture an ID from a URL: /users/{id} . In previous versions of Laravel, you would need to define an individual route for each ID value that you wanted to capture; however, with route wildcards this can all be done in a single route definition!

Laravel Project Example

Laravel is a powerful PHP framework for modern web applications. It provides an easy way to manage your application’s data and logic, making it perfect for rapid development. In this article, we’ll take a look at a Laravel project example and see how it can help you rapidly develop your own web applications.

Laravel projects are typically organized around the Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture. This means that your project’s code is divided into three main folders: The app folder contains the core code of your application.

This is where you’ll define your models, controllers, and views. The public folder contains the publicly accessible assets of your application, such as CSS and JavaScript files. The storage folder contains persistent data used by your application, such as file uploads and database backups.

Laravel also includes a number of other folders that don’t necessarily fit into the MVC paradigm but are still important to the overall structure of your project. These include the bootstrap/cache folder, which contains cached data used by Laravel to speed up performance, and the vendor folder, which contains third-party code libraries installed via Composer . Assuming you have a basic understanding of MVC architecture , let’s take a closer look at each of these folders in turn and see how they’re used in a typical Laravel project .

The App Folder As we mentioned before , the app folder is where you’ll find the core code of your Laravel project . This includes all of your models , controllers , views , and any other PHP classes that make up your application .

For example , if you’re building a blog with Laravel , you might have an Article model that represents individual blog posts . This model would live in the app/Models directory . Similarly , if you had a controller responsible for displaying those articles on screen , it would live in app/Http/Controllers .

Views are slightly different ; they don’t actually live in the app directory at all but are instead stored in resources/views . We’ll talk more about views later on ; for now , just know that they’re kept separate from everything else so that they can be easily reused across different parts of your application . The Public Folder The public folder is exactly what it sounds like : it’s where all of the public – facing assets of your application lives .

Laravel Tutorial

Laravel is a free, open source PHP web application framework. It is an MVC framework that provides an elegant toolkit for building web applications. Laravel was created by Taylor Otwell and released in 2011.

Since then, it has become one of the most popular PHP frameworks available. Laravel is known for its ease of use and expressive syntax. This tutorial will show you how to install Laravel on your local development machine and get started with creating your first Laravel application.

Before we get started, you will need to have the following installed on your machine: PHP >= 7.1.3 Composer

Step 1: Install Laravel Via Composer   The first thing we need to do is install Laravel via Composer. If you don’t have Composer installed on your machine, you can follow this guide to do so.

” In your terminal window, navigate to the directory where you want to install Laravel and run the following command: “composer create-project –prefer-dist laravel/laravel blog” This will create a new directory called “blog” within the current directory and will download all of the necessary files for a fresh installation of Laravel into that directory.” Now that we have our project created, let’s move into our new project directory: “cd blog”. Step 2: Configure Your Environment File   Next, we need to configure our environment file.

The environment file contains settings specific to our environment (database credentials, etc). For this tutorial, we’ll be using a SQLite database.” Open “.

env” in your favorite text editor and update the following line:”DB_CONNECTION=mysql” DB_CONNECTION=sqlite” Save and close “.env”. Step 3: Create Our Database   Now that we have our environment configured, let’s go ahead and create our database. We can do this by running the following Artisan command: php artisan migrate This command will run all of the outstanding migrations for our application which currently includes creating a user table.” Step 4: Start Our Development Server   We’re now ready to start up our development server!

Laravel Documentation

Laravel is a free, open-source PHP web framework created by Taylor Otwell and intended for the development of web applications following the model–view–controller (MVC) architectural pattern. Some of its features are a modular packaging system with a dedicated dependency manager, different ways for accessing relational databases, utilities that aid in application deployment and maintenance, and its orientation toward syntactic sugar. Laravel’s documentation is thorough and complete, making it an excellent resource for learning how to use the framework.

The documentation covers all aspects of Laravel, from installation to configuration to creating your first app. In addition, the docs are constantly updated to reflect changes in the codebase, so you can be confident that you’re always getting accurate information. If you’re new to Laravel or PHP frameworks in general, we recommend starting with the installation guide and then moving on to reading through the rest of the docs at your own pace.

You can also find plenty of helpful tutorials and articles on Laracasts.

How to Create Laravel Project
How to Create Laravel Project 2

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How Do I Create a Laravel Project?

Assuming you have Composer installed on your system, you can create a new Laravel project by running the following command: composer create-project –prefer-dist laravel/laravel blog This will install the latest version of Laravel in a folder named blog.

Once the installation is complete, you can navigate to your project’s folder and start the development server by running the following command:

How Can I Make My First Laravel Project?

If you’re new to Laravel, then starting your first project can be a daunting task. But don’t worry! In this blog post, we’ll walk you through everything you need to know to get started with Laravel.

First, you’ll need to install Laravel. We have a great guide on how to do that here. Once you have Laravel installed, it’s time to start building your first project!

To do that, we’ll use the Laravel command line tool, Artisan. Artisan is a powerful tool that lets us generate boilerplate code for our projects and perform other tasks such as database migrations and managing dependencies. To create a new Laravel project using Artisan, simply run the following command:

How Do I Create a Laravel Project in Windows?

Assuming you have Composer installed on your system, you can create a new Laravel project by running the following command in your terminal: composer create-project –prefer-dist laravel/laravel blog This will install the latest version of Laravel in a folder named blog.

Once the installation is complete, you can navigate to your project’s root directory and start the built-in PHP server with the following command:

How Do I Create a Project in Laravel Composer?

Laravel is a free, open-source PHP web framework created by Taylor Otwell and intended for the development of web applications following the model–view–controller (MVC) architectural pattern. Laravel’s first beta release was made available on June 9, 2011, followed by the Laravel 1 release later in the same month. Laravel aims to make the development process a pleasing one for developers without sacrificing application functionality.

To achieve this, Laravel uses expressive syntax that eases pain points commonly experienced during software projects by making common tasks such as routing, authentication, caching and sessions simpler to implement. In addition to providing developers with an excellent set of tools for building robust web applications, Laravel is also backed by a thriving community of users who are always ready to help out fellow developers in need. If you’re just getting started with Laravel or looking to expand your knowledge of this popular framework, then be sure check out our comprehensive collection of tutorials and articles below.

Now that we have given you a brief introduction to Laravel lets get down to business and find out how you can create a project using Composer. If you’re not familiar with Composer it is simply a tool for dependency management in PHP which allows us to declare the libraries our project depends on and installs them into our project automatically. The first step is obviously installing Composer if you haven’t already done so.

The installation process differs depending on your operating system but full instructions can be found on the official website: https://getcomposer.org/doc/00-intro.md#installation-linux-unix-osx Once composer has been installed we can move onto creating our project folder structure which will look something like this: my_project/ # root directory of our project

app/ # directory containing application code public/ # directory containing publicly accessible files resources/ # directory containing views and other resources

storage/ # storage directory for caches etc.. tests/ # tests directory vendor/ # third party libraries installed via composer

Conclusion

Laravel is a free, open source PHP web framework. It is created by Taylor Otwell and intended for the development of web applications following the model–view–controller (MVC) architectural pattern. Some of its features include a modular packaging system with a dedicated dependency manager, different ways for accessing relational databases, utilities that aid in application deployment and maintenance, and its orientation toward syntactic sugar.

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